Success

Autism?

Success should not be about being doing the same as another person has done, it should be about how far you have come because we all start from a different place

Sometimes being Autistic, or supporting someone who is on the Autistic Spectrum, can be very hard. You often need a lot of small successes to get the big ones that others notice, but the small successes are important.

It’s very common to feel frustrated with a world mostly made for people without Autism, and isolation, for both those supporting someone on the Spectrum and those on the Spectrum, is very common. However, my experiences of my own life and of working with others have been that a positive ‘can do’ attitude (believing that you can and will succeed) is very important. Sometimes a strategy won’t work, so you just have to try another one, but this is true of everyday life.

Don’t Write us off! We can get a job and keep it.

Many people on the Autistic Spectrum can work, if given the the right environment with the right adaptations and/or support. These can be very simple, such as flexi-time hours, a different light bulb, instructions written in a email rather then given verbally, or even working from home. However, everyone is different, so it’s important to find out an individual’s needs. Here’s a video on successful employment.

When you read the comments in the training and speaking section you might think I am the exception to the rule, that I am lucky or different from others, but in all the other jobs I have had, I never got feedback like this. The difference between me then and me now is that I found my ‘niche’; the particular set of skills and knowledge that I am most competent in. I think everyone is capable of gaining the type of feedback that I have done, in their ‘niche job’. You just have to keep trying different kinds of work until you find the one that’s right for you. Autism was not originally my special interest (it was Pink Floyd), but initially I incorporated Pink Floyd into my work, using a multicoloured triangle to represent the prism featured on Dark Side Of The Moon’s front cover. I also felt a strong passion to make things better in the college I studied at, for myself and others, so when offered the chance to train the college staff, I took it. My advice is take every opportunity offered to you, with regards to work and if you feel unsure, ask people you know and trust if they think it is a good idea. When I first started the tutor said to me “this could be your career”. I didn’t believe her at first, but here I am 8 years later.Robyn Steward 2012

You can have romantic relationships and be on the Autistic spectrum.

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22 Things a Woman Must Know If She Loves a Man With Asperger’s Syndrome and 22 Things a Woman With Asperger’s Syndrome Wants Her Partner to Know are two books by Rudy Simone, who has Asperger’s Syndrome. These books sell lots of copies and show you can have romantic relationships and be on the Autistic Spectrum.

Not speaking doesn’t mean Not thinking.

Whilst I don’t agree with calling Autism a ‘mysterious condition’ (as described in the video below) or some of the tone of media that surrounds Autism, this video shows that being non-verbal and having challenging behaviour does not mean you don’t think, and can’t achieve. Carley, when aged 10, started typing messages on her computer, and now has written a book with her Dad about her experiences.

You can have a social life and be on the spectrum:

Pig pen – was a cultural music art performance poetry night. curated by a man with Autism called Gabriel . Gabriel did not speak, he used a Yes No communication device.you can have friends if you want to and enjoy a social life. Its important to note that there are manny ways of socialising and they do not all involve going somewhere noisy and busy such as pig pen.

Everyone has a place in the world

As temple grain explains here.

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